Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

Latest Property Report – 1st quarter of 2018

IN AND AROUND THE CAPE PENINSULA THE CITY’S MOST EXPENSIVE MARKETS CONTINUED TO SHOW THE CLEAREST SIGNS OF SLOWING PRICE GROWTH IN THE 1ST QUARTER.  Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its price growth slow the fastest off the highest base, while in certain more affordable sub-regions of the City there has still been some growth acceleration.

In the 1st quarter of 2018, we saw further slowing in house price growth in the City Bowl and the other major 3 sub-regions closest to the City Bowl, i.e. in and around the Cape Peninsula.

These sub-regions near to the city and the mountain have shown some of the strongest house price inflation of all of the Cape Town sub-regions over the past 5 years, and this prior deterioration in home affordability appears to have led to slowing demand, and thus price growth, in recent quarters.

The most expensive sub-region in the City of Cape Town Metro, i.e. the Atlantic Seaboard, has seen its average house price growth slow the most sharply off the highest base, from a revised multi-year high of 27.5% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2016 to 2.3% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

This does not surprise us, as this sub-region has experienced the most rapid cumulative growth of all the sub-regions over the past 5 years, to the tune of 111%.

The City Bowl started its price growth slowdown a little earlier than the Atlantic Seaboard, and has gone from its revised multi-year year-on-year growth high of 23.6% in the 2nd quarter of 2016 to 10.0% by the 1st quarter of 2018.

The Southern Suburbs, the other one of the “most expensive 3” sub-regions, saw further slowdown from 10.1% in the prior quarter to 8.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, having gradually slowed from a multi-year high of 16.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2015.

Arguably reflective of the heightened search for relative affordability in or near to Cape Town’s prime place of employment, the City Bowl, is the indication that the most affordable sub-region within close proximity to the City Bowl, i.e. the Near Eastern Suburbs sub-region (including amongst others Salt River, Woodstock and Pinelands), shows the fastest house price growth of these “Major 4” sub-regions in or near to the Cape Peninsula.

Proximity to the City Bowl (and for that matter to Claremont Business Node) is becoming increasingly important as the city’s traffic congestion deteriorates. From a 19.4% high in the 1st quarter of 2016, the Near Eastern Suburbs House Price Index has also seen year-on-year growth slowing, but less significantly than the others, to reach 13.4% by the 1st quarter of 2018. It now has the fastest price growth rate of the Major 4 sub-regions surrounding Table Mountain.

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THE TREND OF SLOWING GROWTH IS LESS PRONOUNCED IN THE MORE AFFORDABLE SUBURBAN MARKETS, AND SOME SUB-REGIONS EVEN SHOW STRENGTHENING PRICE GROWTH.

Further away from Table Mountain, in Cape Town’s more affordable suburban areas, the pattern of “slowdown” in price growth remains less clear, and there has even been some acceleration in certain sub-regions. We remain of the belief that the extremely high prices in the areas close to the City Bowl may have been encouraging a portion of aspirant buyers to shift their home search to these more “affordable” City of Cape Town housing markets a little further away, in search of greater affordability.

All 3 major Northern Suburbs sub-saw double-digit average house price growth rates in the 1st quarter of 2018, with 1 out of the 3 showing a growth acceleration.

The Western Seaboard Sub-Region (including Blouberg, Milnerton and Melkbosstrand) saw a slowing in year-on-year price growth, from 14.7% in the previous quarter to 14.4% in the 1st quarter of 2018, the 2nd successive quarter of slowing growth.

The “Bellville-Parow and Surroundings” sub-region also saw its price growth slow, from 11.4% year-on-year in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.8% in the 1st quarter of 2018, after prior quarters of strengthening.

However, the Durbanville – Kraaifontein – Brackenfell sub-region continued to accelerate mildly, from 9.8% growth in the final quarter of 2017 to 10.1% in the 1st quarter of 2018.

Moving into even more affordable regions, ones which incorporate many of the city’s Apartheid Era former so-called “Coloured” and “Black” Areas, we have recently seen price growth accelerations.

This, too, we believe could reflect a mounting search for relative affordability after rapid price inflation in the higher priced “suburban” areas in recent years.

Therefore, we have seen the Cape Flats House Price Index experience a further growth acceleration, from 11.4% year-on-year in the previous quarter to 11.6% in the 1st quarter of 2018. The Elsies River-Blue Downs-Macassar Region has also seen house price growth accelerate further to reach 25% year-on-year, from 23.7% in the previous quarter.

CONCLUSION

In short, in the 1st quarter of 2018, the City of Cape Town has seen further mild slowing in average house price growth for the 7th consecutive quarter, although the most recent 10.0% year-on-year growth rate remains strong.

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Source:  John Loos FNB Property Barometer

This has been distributed by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Leisurely rambles to invigorating hikes, something for everyone!

Whether you’re after a windswept coastal wander, a mountainous hike with spectacular views, or a leisurely amble through one of the Cape’s lush nature reserves, here’s our pick of the best hiking trails in and around the city. So, lace up your hiking boots and get cracking… And, let us know your thoughts in the comments below.

Important note:
Although the Cape is rich in natural beauty, tourists and locals are urged to take necessary precautions when exploring secluded areas, as crimes and accidents do happen.
Those venturing into the Table Mountain National Park should have the following emergency numbers on hand: 086 110 6417/ 107 or 021 480 7700. Criminal incidents should be reported to the nearest police station as soon as able.
We also recommend @safetymountain as a useful resource for hikers. This free safety tracking service allows you to notify local trackers of your contact details, intended route and travel time via whatsapp. You are then able to provide hourly updates on your progress, and to notify trackers when you are safely off the mountain.

It helps to have a map, and for that, SANParks and The Inside Guide recommends Slingsby Maps as an essential resource for hiking enthusiasts. Detailed maps of some of the Cape’s best hiking trails are available, including the Pipe Track, Cape Point and the Cederberg. Contact Slingsby Maps at 021 788 4545 for more information.

Hiking trails in Cape Town
Hiking trails around the Cape

Source:  https://insideguide.co.za/cape-town/hiking-trails/

This post brought to you by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Computer Assisted Property Valuation

Computer Assisted Property Valuation

If you are moving home, getting a reliable property valuation is an essential step in the process.

A property valuation will give you an estimate of how much your house should be worth, based upon a number of different factors.

Even if you are not planning to move home straight away, house valuations remain an excellent tool to indicate a current market value and what improvements could be made should you want to potentially increase the value of your home without over capitalising.

By answering a few easy questions on the current condition of your home, our free property value calculator which uses the latest GIS (Geographic Information Systems) will give you an idea of how much money you could potentially make from the sale of your home.

Unique to Valuator we are also able to reference recent final property sales (selected Cape Town metropolitan areas) that have not yet been recorded in the Deeds Office which makes our report that much more current and reliable!

Get your free Valuator report today!
These reports are free until 1st June 2018

Valuator is a service operated in association with Chas Everitt by:

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New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations

New South African plug standard is mandatory for new installations
South Africa’s new plug and socket standard, SANS 164-2 or ZA Plug, has become mandatory for new installations, the SABS confirmed to MyBroadband.

This means that any new buildings erected must incorporate electrical sockets that conform to the new standard.

An amendment to the wiring code introduced in 2016 stated that the ZA Plug would become semi-mandatory for new installations in March 2018.

Each new plug point must have at least one socket that can accommodate a ZA Plug, it said.

The amendment came into effect two months early, said the SABS, and from January 2018 all new installations must incorporate the ZA Plug.

The ZA Plug has the same hexagonal profile as the Europlug seen on cell phone chargers but includes an earth pin. It is substantially more compact than South Africa’s three-prong plug standard and has much thinner pins.

Adoption of the standard has been slow, however.

Gianfranco Campetti, the chairman of the working group that looks after the standard, said the industry has been slow to respond and use the standard in essential products.

He said the appliance industry, in particular, has been slow to provide goods with the new plug.

The switch

When the IEC first began development on IEC–906–1, which became IEC60906–1, it was trying to establish a universal plug and socket system.

Despite its efforts, commercial and political interests caused the standardisation initiative to fail in Europe – and Brazil and South Africa are the only countries to have adopted the 250V standard.

However, Brazil deviated from the standard by delivering either 127V or 220V mains using the same socket.

Japan and the US have plugs and sockets that are compatible with the IEC’s envisioned global standard for 125V sockets.

Talk of adopting the new standard began in South Africa in 1993, and a version of SANS 164–2 that dates back to 2006 is available online.

According to the SABS, the ZA Plug appeared in South Africa’s wiring code (SANS 10142–1) during 2012.

Old standard still legal

Although it is now required to integrate sockets which comply with the ZA Plug standard in new buildings, the old standard remains legal.

The wiring code amendment also does not affect existing buildings, including homes.

It is therefore not currently necessary for South Africans to switch the electrical sockets in their homes.

Article source

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Innovative local students launch online textbook resale platform

Bramble is an online platform aimed at connecting students wanting to sell or buy textbooks, as well as physical and electronic notes. This not only allows students to earn an extra income, but it also makes the learning process a whole lot easier.

As students ourselves, we understand the real life of a student and we hope to give you more room for the good life, more time for studying and, most importantly, more money at the end of the month.

The Bramble platform has one major beneficiary,

– the students.

We hope that the creation of a platform that allows students to set their own prices will allow shopping for textbooks to be more affordable and less stressful.


This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt International 

Kalk Bay harbour parking area gets a facelift

Kalk Bay harbour parking area gets a facelift

From: the City Of Cape Town

23 February 2018

The parking area at the Kalk Bay harbour has received a much-needed facelift. Apart from the newly surfaced parking layout, the City’s Transport and Urban Development Authority (TDA) has added paved walkways to the rocky shoreline along with benches, streetlights, and a recreational area for markets, fairs, and exhibitions during community events.

The upgrade of the Kalk Bay harbour parking area formed part of the Main Road rehabilitation project which included the restoration of parking areas along this scenic route from Muizenberg to Clovelly in the Far South.

‘At first glance the upgrade of the parking area at the Kalk Bay harbour may not seem that important, but the revitalisation of this area makes a huge difference to the local community and visitors. Previously the traffic along Main Road would back up considerably with long queues forming due to the constrained parking conditions at the harbour.

‘We have improved the access to the parking area by formalising the layout with asphalt surfacing and line markings. These measures assist with traffic flow along Main Road which is very busy during the tourist season, over weekends, and during peak hour periods on weekdays,’ said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Transport and Urban Development, Councillor Brett Herron.

An important aspect of the rehabilitation project was to increase the versatility of the area through intelligent urban design, and additional features.

‘We have, for example, added a play area for children, as well as a paved recreational area next to the parking area which can be used for markets, fairs, exhibitions, and other community events. We have installed benches along the walkways to the rocky shore where visitors can watch the sunrise over False Bay and Simon’s Town in the distance.

‘Again, the walkways may not seem that significant but, coupled with additional streetlights and the benches, the features make this area more accessible to the public so that they can fully enjoy the natural beauty of this space with its 360 degree views,’ said Councillor Herron.

New red brick stairs lead from the parking area to the lower section of the harbour.

‘The retaining wall is cladded with sandstone that was excavated during the rehabilitation of Main Road in prior months. Previously, visitors had to walk around the parking area and in the traffic to get to the lower section of the harbour below. Thus, the steps provide safe and easier access to visitors,’ said Councillor Herron.

The local community was involved in this project right from the start.

‘We presented concepts to residents who made suggestions. Their contributions were taken into account and I am happy to say that we have received overwhelming support for this project. We can achieve a lot and can make this city even greater when we work together. I am confident that visitors and the local community will benefit from this upgrade for years to come,’ said Councillor Herron.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape town south

Blue Bird Garage Market

Blue Bird Garage Market

Due to the popularity and awesome feedback of our Sunday markets over the last few months, Blue Bird Garage will be open on the first Sunday of every month for a day filled with delicious food, refreshing drinks, awesome shopping options and good vibes.

Blue Bird Garage is family friendly! Your kids are covered in our kiddies area and your dogs are also welcome! Bring them through (on a lead) and treat them to an awesome outing and hopefully a few treats.

Handcrafted with love! Beautiful and unique, Thimble toys will be available at our first Sunday market! Spoil a little one with one of these amazing toys.

 

Date: 4 March 2018

Time: 11:00–16:00

Venue: Blue Bird Garage, 39 Albertyn road, Muizenberg

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

The Echo of a Noise

The Echo of a Noise

Having performed alone on the stages of the world for well over seven thousand times, Pieter-Dirk Uys has learnt that every show is the first and the last performance – because each audience demands and gets a different energy, topicality and excitement. Now in his 71st year, he doesn’t glance back at the successes and failures that have strengthened his belief in a constant improvement of his work, but at those small signposts that throughout his life subconsciously have pointed him in a right and original direction – his father Hannes Uys, his mother Helga Bassel, his grandmothers, his teachers, his passions; Sophia Loren, censorship, false eyelashes and making a noise when everyone demanded silence.

 

 

South Africa’s foremost satirist sits on a barstool, wearing his black beanie on his head and his Almost Famous sweatshirt, and with his impish smile, he even looks like a naughty goblin trapped by the spotlight. Within minutes he fills the auditorium with his presence. This is just Pieter-Dirk Uys speaking and he opens his heart and talks about his private and public life. The big hair and silky repartee of Evita Bezuidenhout or the smoky drone of the sexy Bambi Kellermann have been stored elsewhere for some other time. It soon becomes clear that the title of his autobiographical one-man memoir, The Echo of a Noise, doesn’t really do justice to what he presents here. He leads you into his inner sanctuary, takes you through our history and shows where what is public and private meet.

Uys was and still is a voice in the wilderness, ever since he first appeared fearlessly on a stage in the 1970s. He jokes that the all-powerful censor board was his own personal public relations department. And how brilliantly they banned his work: even to the extent of declaring a word Uys invented as obscene, a word that they couldn’t find in any dictionary. We hear the recording of the voice of little Pietertjie Uys singing like an angel and accompanied on the piano by his father, Hannes Uys, whom he would accompany on Sundays to the church where Hannes was organist – the father whom he loved, but didn’t like very much; the sternest critic of his work and yet the one who could also give good advice. He tells of his father’s last moments, being with him as he died and then going back to the family home where Sannie, the housekeeper and his ‘Cape Flats mother’, asked if there wasn’t any washing from ‘Pa’. The audience is spellbound as he shares the suicide of his German mother, Helga, as well as the influences on him of his Afrikaans and German grandmothers.

It’s as if Uys constantly takes his audience into his confidence and so breaks all the rules and crosses boundaries. He remains a master storyteller who can make as much fun of himself as he does with the others who get a lashing from his sharp tongue.

Date: 18 March 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: The Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Water meter readings

Water meter readings

From the City of Cape Town:

Your home or business is connected to the City’s water network through a water meter, which usually sits in a small chamber under the pavement outside your property. We read your water meter once a month to calculate your monthly water and sewerage use.

How the City reads your water meter

The meter is read by a different person each month. We take a meter reading using a handheld computer terminal that contains core information about the property, such as the erf number and the address.

If we cannot read your meter (due to your gate being locked or other circumstances) and you do not submit your water reading, your bill will be an estimate based on your previous water use. All cost estimates will be reversed, if necessary, when we get an actual reading.

DID YOU KNOW?Well-run City: Each year, we replace about 9 000 old or malfunctioning water meters. 

You can help us get an accurate reading for your water meter by doing the following:

  • Make sure you know where your water meter is located.
  • Make sure it is not obstructed (e.g. by sand or weeds) and is easy to read.
  • Your water meter should be accessible to City officials at all times.
  • If your water meter is behind locked gates, or if dogs prevent the meter readers from taking a reading, you can submit the reading yourself (see below).
  • Alternatively, ask the City to relocate your meter to the outside of your house, via the City’s Service Requests application.

How to read your water meter

You can submit your water meter reading by calling 0860 103 089 or entering it online via your municipal account on our e-Services portal.

No matter the type of water meter, black numbers represent kilolitres and red numbers represent litres. As you are charged per kilolitre, only supply the black numbers when submitting your reading.

DID YOU KNOW?

Inclusive City: The City has installed free-call phones at some City facilities to allow you to make enquiries and request services at no cost.

Water and sanitation tariffs

All formal properties have water meters, which we use to read your water consumption and calculate your monthly bill. However, there are different tariffs for residences, businesses, and other organisations.

  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation in your home
  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation for your business or organisation

Report problems with your water meter

If your water meter is not being read regularly, is malfunctioning or needs to be relocated to outside of your property, please contact the City’s 24-hour call centre:

  • Call us on 0860 103 089 (choose option 2: water-related faults)
  • SMS: 31373 (max of 160 characters)
  • Whatsapp: 063 407 3699
  • Email: water@capetown.gov.za

You can also go to our service requests portal and report or request an issue online. If you need some help with how to place a service request or report an issue, please see Submit a service request.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Muizenberg, Looking Back

Muizenberg, Looking Back

The village of Muizenberg was established by the Dutch in 1743 as a military post on the road between Cape Town and Simon’s Town. It was named after Wynand Willem Muijs, sergeant in charge of the post in 1844, and later commander of the Cape garrison. The railway line from Wynberg reached Muizenberg on 15 December 1882.

Muizenberg was initially merely a halt on the long road between Table Bay and Simon’s Bay, a turnpike/toll (the first in the country) and a military watch. The small, rather shambolic, but historically pivotal Battle of Muizenberg in 1795 led to the British taking initial control over the Cape from the Dutch (finally cemented at the Battle of Blaauwberg).

The remnants of the fort of that battle can still be visited. But it was only in the 1820s that the establishment of an inn of rather dubious repute began the transformation of Muizenberg to the holiday resort it became. Called Farmer Pecks Inn, it became an important stopover for travellers on their way from Cape Town to Simon’s Town, and raised the entertainment profile of the area. They put up the first bathing box. Other private bathing boxes began to appear (the strict social codes of bathing were a far cry from the casualness of today) and, with the arrival of the railway by the late 1800s, land was sold for residential development and people were thronging to the white sands of Muizenberg, immortalised by regular visitor Rudyard Kipling in his poem ‘The Flowers’: “Buy a bunch of weed/ White as the sand of Muizenberg/Spun before the gale”.

Added impetus was provided by Cecil John Rhodes, who built a house there and encouraged his friends and colleagues to do the same. The arrival of the new mining magnates from Kimberley and Johannesburg provided a shimmering seal of approval, and many of their mansions can still be viewed along what was then known as Millionaires Row.

After the Anglo-Boer War, the area was considered a good tonic for soldiers, and the town began to pay proper attention to its popularity with new bathing boxes, pavilions and a handsome new Edwardian railway station befitting its status. In 1911, the first aeroplane to deliver mail in South Africa made its maiden voyage to the postmaster at Muizenberg. The village was transformed.

Although Muizenberg lost its premier resort status in the 1970s, the sand and sea are as attractive now as they were then. The village retains much of its charm and many historic buildings have been restored. A major Muizenberg attraction is surfing: considered a very long, mellow wave, and especially good for those learning to surf as well as for the longboarding fraternity, it follows the traditions of being the birthplace of prone surfing on wooden belly-boards in South Africa in 1910, and then the first stand-up surfing in 1919. Mystery author Agatha Christie visited the beach in 1922, surfing in her green wool bathing suit. Famous Irish playwright and author George Bernard Shaw was photographed surfing at Muizenberg in 1932, at the age of 75.

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This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South