Blue Bird Garage Market

Blue Bird Garage Market

Due to the popularity and awesome feedback of our Sunday markets over the last few months, Blue Bird Garage will be open on the first Sunday of every month for a day filled with delicious food, refreshing drinks, awesome shopping options and good vibes.

Blue Bird Garage is family friendly! Your kids are covered in our kiddies area and your dogs are also welcome! Bring them through (on a lead) and treat them to an awesome outing and hopefully a few treats.

Handcrafted with love! Beautiful and unique, Thimble toys will be available at our first Sunday market! Spoil a little one with one of these amazing toys.

 

Date: 4 March 2018

Time: 11:00–16:00

Venue: Blue Bird Garage, 39 Albertyn road, Muizenberg

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

The Echo of a Noise

The Echo of a Noise

Having performed alone on the stages of the world for well over seven thousand times, Pieter-Dirk Uys has learnt that every show is the first and the last performance – because each audience demands and gets a different energy, topicality and excitement. Now in his 71st year, he doesn’t glance back at the successes and failures that have strengthened his belief in a constant improvement of his work, but at those small signposts that throughout his life subconsciously have pointed him in a right and original direction – his father Hannes Uys, his mother Helga Bassel, his grandmothers, his teachers, his passions; Sophia Loren, censorship, false eyelashes and making a noise when everyone demanded silence.

 

 

South Africa’s foremost satirist sits on a barstool, wearing his black beanie on his head and his Almost Famous sweatshirt, and with his impish smile, he even looks like a naughty goblin trapped by the spotlight. Within minutes he fills the auditorium with his presence. This is just Pieter-Dirk Uys speaking and he opens his heart and talks about his private and public life. The big hair and silky repartee of Evita Bezuidenhout or the smoky drone of the sexy Bambi Kellermann have been stored elsewhere for some other time. It soon becomes clear that the title of his autobiographical one-man memoir, The Echo of a Noise, doesn’t really do justice to what he presents here. He leads you into his inner sanctuary, takes you through our history and shows where what is public and private meet.

Uys was and still is a voice in the wilderness, ever since he first appeared fearlessly on a stage in the 1970s. He jokes that the all-powerful censor board was his own personal public relations department. And how brilliantly they banned his work: even to the extent of declaring a word Uys invented as obscene, a word that they couldn’t find in any dictionary. We hear the recording of the voice of little Pietertjie Uys singing like an angel and accompanied on the piano by his father, Hannes Uys, whom he would accompany on Sundays to the church where Hannes was organist – the father whom he loved, but didn’t like very much; the sternest critic of his work and yet the one who could also give good advice. He tells of his father’s last moments, being with him as he died and then going back to the family home where Sannie, the housekeeper and his ‘Cape Flats mother’, asked if there wasn’t any washing from ‘Pa’. The audience is spellbound as he shares the suicide of his German mother, Helga, as well as the influences on him of his Afrikaans and German grandmothers.

It’s as if Uys constantly takes his audience into his confidence and so breaks all the rules and crosses boundaries. He remains a master storyteller who can make as much fun of himself as he does with the others who get a lashing from his sharp tongue.

Date: 18 March 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: The Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Water meter readings

Water meter readings

From the City of Cape Town:

Your home or business is connected to the City’s water network through a water meter, which usually sits in a small chamber under the pavement outside your property. We read your water meter once a month to calculate your monthly water and sewerage use.

How the City reads your water meter

The meter is read by a different person each month. We take a meter reading using a handheld computer terminal that contains core information about the property, such as the erf number and the address.

If we cannot read your meter (due to your gate being locked or other circumstances) and you do not submit your water reading, your bill will be an estimate based on your previous water use. All cost estimates will be reversed, if necessary, when we get an actual reading.

DID YOU KNOW?Well-run City: Each year, we replace about 9 000 old or malfunctioning water meters. 

You can help us get an accurate reading for your water meter by doing the following:

  • Make sure you know where your water meter is located.
  • Make sure it is not obstructed (e.g. by sand or weeds) and is easy to read.
  • Your water meter should be accessible to City officials at all times.
  • If your water meter is behind locked gates, or if dogs prevent the meter readers from taking a reading, you can submit the reading yourself (see below).
  • Alternatively, ask the City to relocate your meter to the outside of your house, via the City’s Service Requests application.

How to read your water meter

You can submit your water meter reading by calling 0860 103 089 or entering it online via your municipal account on our e-Services portal.

No matter the type of water meter, black numbers represent kilolitres and red numbers represent litres. As you are charged per kilolitre, only supply the black numbers when submitting your reading.

DID YOU KNOW?

Inclusive City: The City has installed free-call phones at some City facilities to allow you to make enquiries and request services at no cost.

Water and sanitation tariffs

All formal properties have water meters, which we use to read your water consumption and calculate your monthly bill. However, there are different tariffs for residences, businesses, and other organisations.

  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation in your home
  • Understand the cost of water and sanitation for your business or organisation

Report problems with your water meter

If your water meter is not being read regularly, is malfunctioning or needs to be relocated to outside of your property, please contact the City’s 24-hour call centre:

  • Call us on 0860 103 089 (choose option 2: water-related faults)
  • SMS: 31373 (max of 160 characters)
  • Whatsapp: 063 407 3699
  • Email: water@capetown.gov.za

You can also go to our service requests portal and report or request an issue online. If you need some help with how to place a service request or report an issue, please see Submit a service request.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Muizenberg, Looking Back

Muizenberg, Looking Back

The village of Muizenberg was established by the Dutch in 1743 as a military post on the road between Cape Town and Simon’s Town. It was named after Wynand Willem Muijs, sergeant in charge of the post in 1844, and later commander of the Cape garrison. The railway line from Wynberg reached Muizenberg on 15 December 1882.

Muizenberg was initially merely a halt on the long road between Table Bay and Simon’s Bay, a turnpike/toll (the first in the country) and a military watch. The small, rather shambolic, but historically pivotal Battle of Muizenberg in 1795 led to the British taking initial control over the Cape from the Dutch (finally cemented at the Battle of Blaauwberg).

The remnants of the fort of that battle can still be visited. But it was only in the 1820s that the establishment of an inn of rather dubious repute began the transformation of Muizenberg to the holiday resort it became. Called Farmer Pecks Inn, it became an important stopover for travellers on their way from Cape Town to Simon’s Town, and raised the entertainment profile of the area. They put up the first bathing box. Other private bathing boxes began to appear (the strict social codes of bathing were a far cry from the casualness of today) and, with the arrival of the railway by the late 1800s, land was sold for residential development and people were thronging to the white sands of Muizenberg, immortalised by regular visitor Rudyard Kipling in his poem ‘The Flowers’: “Buy a bunch of weed/ White as the sand of Muizenberg/Spun before the gale”.

Added impetus was provided by Cecil John Rhodes, who built a house there and encouraged his friends and colleagues to do the same. The arrival of the new mining magnates from Kimberley and Johannesburg provided a shimmering seal of approval, and many of their mansions can still be viewed along what was then known as Millionaires Row.

After the Anglo-Boer War, the area was considered a good tonic for soldiers, and the town began to pay proper attention to its popularity with new bathing boxes, pavilions and a handsome new Edwardian railway station befitting its status. In 1911, the first aeroplane to deliver mail in South Africa made its maiden voyage to the postmaster at Muizenberg. The village was transformed.

Although Muizenberg lost its premier resort status in the 1970s, the sand and sea are as attractive now as they were then. The village retains much of its charm and many historic buildings have been restored. A major Muizenberg attraction is surfing: considered a very long, mellow wave, and especially good for those learning to surf as well as for the longboarding fraternity, it follows the traditions of being the birthplace of prone surfing on wooden belly-boards in South Africa in 1910, and then the first stand-up surfing in 1919. Mystery author Agatha Christie visited the beach in 1922, surfing in her green wool bathing suit. Famous Irish playwright and author George Bernard Shaw was photographed surfing at Muizenberg in 1932, at the age of 75.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

 

Per Thornberg & Dan Shout at Casa Labia

Per Thornberg & Dan Shout at Casa Labia

Casa Labia presents a jazz performance by Swedish saxophonist, Per Thornberg and South African saxophonist, Dan Shout, along with Andrew Lilley on piano, Charles Lazar on double bass and Kevin Gibson on drums.

Tenor saxophonist, Thornberg, is a jazz musicians of note from Halmstad, Sweden. He has played jazz/improvised music for 30 years from solo/duo settings to big band. He has performed with Lars Jansson, Bobo Stenson, Yasuhito Mori and more, and has performed as a guest artist in Denmark, Norway, France, SA, Italy, Spain, Germany, Australia, USA and the UK.

Shout is a respected, sought-after jazz musician, educator and business owner based in Cape Town. He has performed in over 30 countries across five continents with the likes of Johnny Clegg, Winston Mankunku, Maria Schneider and more.

Venue: Casa Labia, 192 Main Rd, Muizenberg, Cape Town
Time: 8pm to 9pm
Cost: R150 (bookings via phone or email)

Date: 25 February 2018

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Thingphony – A Symphony of Things

Join physicist-philosopher-pianist Philip Southey for an unforgettable romp through quantum physics, improvised classical music and tantric philosophy, as we explore some of the weird ways we make sense of our world. “Electron”, “Major 7th”, “Orgasm” and “Orange” are just some of the “things” we’ll explore in in this theatrical symphony.

 

Philip has played bagpipes for the queen. He also graduated with a BSc Astrophysics from UCT and a BA Philosophy from Oxford University. Born in Cape Town, he enjoys a special connection with the porcupines of Table Mountain, and playing the piano is his favourite hobby and pious pursuit. He is in his second last year (the second year to be called his “last year”) of a PhD in Physics Education at UCT.

Date: 3 march 2018

Time: 8.30PM

Venue: Kalk Bay Theatre, 52 Main Road, Kalk Bay.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape town South

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr and Friends at Cape to Cuba

Tim Parr first came to national prominence in the southern-rock blues band Baxtop, where he shared guitar duties with Larry Amos in the Joburg club scene of 1976. Rising quickly to the top of the national circuit and winning the SABC battle of the bands, they recorded “Work it Out” for Warner Brothers in 1979, which remains an enduring SA classic.

Tim then formed Ella Mental with Heather Mac, which was one of the iconic 80’s bands to have a string of radio hits in South Africa playing many of the countries top festivals. When the SA scene imploded they relocated to Ireland for 7 years. Tim then returned to South Africa to form the Zap Dragons who gigged hard throughout that emotional period in SA’s history. His solo album “Still Standing” is a brilliant mix of country, pop, blues, soul and rock with the title track a firm favourite among SA audiences.

The common thread throughout all these projects has been Tim’s expressive and soulful guitar playing, and unlike many guitarists his rhythm and textural playing is as distinctive as his lead work. New songs and albums are in the pipeline including some that will feature his piano playing, and we look forward to hearing more from this natural musician and songwriter in his ongoing journey.

Date: 25 February 2018

Time: 4 PM – 7 PM

Venue: Cape To Cuba, 165 Main Rd, Kalkbay.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

Take up the #AtoBChallenge & Cycle to Open Streets

Take up the #AtoBChallenge & Cycle to Open Streets

Join the #AtoBChallenge Bike Bus and cycle to Open Streets Main Road on the 25th February. Participants stand a chance to win a bicycle!

This year Open Streets Cape Town and Bicycle South have teamed up to activate a series of bicycle commuter routes around Cape Town. Aimed to encourage more people to go by bike and experience new ways of moving around the city, the #AtoBChallenge kicks off with a Bike Bus (group cycle) to Open Streets Main Road.

The Bike bus will start from Muizenberg and make its way Open Streets Main Road via Main Road, there will be various pick up points along the way. We encourage participants to arrive half an hour before indicated departure times, so that we can leave on time. Pickup points include:

1. Muizenberg – Knead Bakery, departing at 9:00 am
2. Tokai – Bootleggers, departing at 9:30 am
3. Wynberg – Four & Twenty, departing at 10:00 am
4. Claremont – Knead Palmyra Centre, departing at 10:15 am
5. Mowbray – The Gear Change, departing at 10:45 am
6. OS Main Road – arriving at 11:00 am
7. Single return trip (OS Main Road to Muizenberg) at 1:00 pm

WHAT YOU NEED TO BRING
✓ A bike in working order (take it to the bike shop for a check up if it hasn’t been ridden lately).
✓ Helmet
✓ Water
✓ A lock to secure your bike at your destination
✓ A pump + tube/repair kit
✓ A sense of fun and some friends too

* Please note that you are responsible for your own safety while riding with the group, however one of the best things about the bike bus is safety in numbers – the more people who ride together, the higher the visibility the bike bus has.

HOW TO ENTER THE #ATOBCHALLENGE AND STAND A CHANCE TO WIN A BIKE!

You will need to follow these steps:
1. Take a picture of yourself commuting to Open Streets Main Road on the 25 Feb on your chosen mode of transport (a video is even better!)
2. Post your picture on social media with the hashtag #AtoBChallenge and tag @OpenStreetsCT (Twitter) or @OpenStreetsCapeTown (Facebook, Instagram)
3. Share your feedback when you get to Open Streets Main Road. Open Streets Cape Town will be waiting for you with a little present at the Open Streets info booth opposite Aberdeen Park.

Participants stand a chance of winning a brand-new bicycle from Ubuntu Bikes as well as safety gear and MyCiTi myconnect cards.

Date: 25 February 2018

Time: 9 AM – 2 PM

Venue: Knead Bakery, Surfer’s Corner, Beach Road, Muizenberg.

For More Information

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

International Childhood Cancer Day

International Childhood Cancer Day

February 15, 2018

International Childhood Cancer Day which highlights the need for concerted global actions to address the growing challenge posed by this non-communicable disease. Globally, childhood and adolescent cancer is threatening to overtake infectious diseases, as one of the highest causes of disease-related mortality in children.

It is a day when we come together to continue the work to “Advance Cures and Transform Care” and to make childhood cancer a national and global child health priority.

Much work remains to be done. According to IARC (2015), the reported worldwide incidence of childhood cancer is increasing, from 165,000 new cases annually to 215,000 cases for children 14 years and younger and 85,000 new cases for 15-19 year-olds. Many more remain uncounted and unreported due to a lack of childhood cancer registries in a large number of countries.

While the number of children with cancer is much less compared to global incidence of adult cancers, the number of lives saved is significantly higher; survival rates in high-income countries reach an average of 84% and are steadily improving even in less-resourced areas of the world where there is local and international support.

The ICCD campaign’s ultimate goal and unified message is “Advance Cures and Transform Care”. This message spotlights the inequities and glaring disparity of access to care in most low- and middle-income countries where 80% of children with cancer live. Children and adolescents in Africa, Asia and Latin America and in parts of Eastern and Southern Europe do not yet have access to appropriate treatment including essential medicines and specialized care. Currently, where one lives often determines one’s ability to survive childhood cancer.

The 188 member organizations of Childhood Cancer International (CCI) in 96 countries as the largest non-profit patient support organization for childhood cancer and the 1000 healthcare professionals from 110 countries who are members of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) ask everyone to come together in solidarity to make sure children and adolescents everywhere have the chance to survive cancer and live long, productive and meaningful lives.

“The chance for a cure, the chance to live, should not be an accident of geography. There is nothing scarier than realizing that your child has cancer. However, there is nothing more tragic than knowing that treatment and cure does exist for your particular child’s cancer and with excellent outcomes, BUT… that it is not available for your child. Why? Because your child happens to live in the wrong hemisphere! It is time to take action to stop this cruel atrocity… makes your voices heard on International Childhood Cancer Day and demand from world leaders to ACT and HELP SAVE ALL CHILDREN regardless of where they live!”
(HRH Princess Dina Mired, mother of childhood cancer survivor, President-elect, UICC).

 

For the next 3 years we will build on a campaign to:

  1. Build global awareness that more than 300,000 children each year are diagnosed with cancer.
  2. Build global awareness that many types of childhood cancer are curable if given:
    • The right to early and proper diagnosis;
    • The right to access life-saving essential medicines;
    • The right to appropriate and quality medical treatments, and;
    • The right to follow up care, services and sustainable livelihood opportunities for survivors.
  3. Work towards the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 3.4 to reduce premature mortality one-third by 2030.
    • Too often when it comes to childhood cancer we are faced with a response of “but.”
    • “But” there aren’t enough children to develop new drugs;
    • “But” the treatment is too expensive;
    • “But” there aren’t enough doctors,
    • “But” …

 

Ruth Hoffman, Global President, Childhood Cancer International

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South

The Fish Hoek Story

The Fish Hoek Story

Author –Joy Cobern

Imagine living in the southern suburbs of Cape Town in the 1870s, where would you go for a day out and how would you get there? There were no cars and horses were expensive to keep unless you needed them for your business. Perhaps you knew someone with a horse and cart so, as a great treat you could go to Muizenberg beach. Then, in 1882, the railway was extended from Wynberg to Muizenberg and suddenly it became easy to have a day at the beach.

In those days Fish Hoek was a farm in the country with a beautiful but remote beach. In 1883 the railway line reached Kalk Bay but it was not until 1890 that it was extended to Simon’s Town passing along Fish Hoek beach. The owners of the farm, having seen Muizenberg become a fashionable resort after the arrival of the railway, could not have been pleased when the railway authorities wanted to purchase land for the line but they could not refuse. A station was built opposite what is now Windsor Lodge. This was just a wooden platform with no shelter from the south easter and it was not until about 1910, after many complaints from travellers that a small waiting room was built at each end of the platform.

At that time the owner of the Fish Hoek Farm was Hester de Villiers who lived in the farmhouse, on the site of the present Homestead Naval Mess, with her husband Izaak de Villiers. She had bought the farm in 1883. She was then fifty one years old, a teacher who, with her sister, had run a small school in Cape Town. For an unmarried lady of her age to buy property was very unusual, but she came to Fish Hoek and ran the farm on her own. At the age of sixty nine she married Jacob Izaak de Villiers who had a farm at Noordhoek. He left one of his sons to run his farm and came to run the Fish Hoek Farm with her.

Previous owners of the farm had mainly wanted it for the fishing rights, but Hester de Kock, as she was then, cultivated fields of wheat and vegetables and it was probably Hester who built the barn, now Mountain View cottages, this is the oldest building in Fish Hoek. As the farm expanded more water was needed so in 1902 she bought the water rights to the Kleintuin spring at Clovelly and pipes were laid to bring the water to Fish Hoek to irrigate the fields and supply the farmhouse.

The first official grant of land at Fish Hoek was made in 1818, by Lord Charles Somerset. One of the stipulations in that grant was that the beach should remain open to the public but as it was not easy to access the number of visitors was small. However, the building of the railway line changed that. It was now easy for the citizens of Cape Town to get on the train to Simon’s Town, get off at the Fish Hoek station, and walk, and perhaps picnic, on the beach. Izaak de Villiers kept a strict eye on them, any rowdy behaviour or leaving of litter and they would be immediately reprimanded. Talking to visitors it soon became obvious that many of them would like to be able to stay in the area. So Hester de Villiers started letting rooms in the farmhouse and, when this became popular converted the barn and the coach house to rooms. Uitkyk, the building on the site of the old whaling station, was converted to a holiday cottage and camping was allowed next to the barn. So it was that Hester de Villiers became our first Fish Hoek tourist entrepreneur.

Having no children of her own it seems that Hester had come to regard the eight children of Izaak’s first marriage as her own. In her will she left the farm to her husband but asked that on his death the land should be sold and the proceeds divided equally between all her step children but the farmhouse was left to her two step daughters. She left a sum of £150 “to be placed in the savings bank at Cape Town and used for the maintenance of the family cemetery”. She died in 1914 and Izaak in 1916. They are both, with other members of the family, buried in the family cemetery which is now beside the Dutch Reformed church in Fish Hoek, whose members look after it.

This post is sponsored by Chas Everitt Cape Town South